Brittany Morgan


Amelia Earhart

There are many famous people in the world. Some external image arrow-10x10.png of people are Meghan Trainor, Taylor Swift, Kim Kardashian, etc. We know them because of their music or gossip. But what do we know about the people who helped to shape our world? One person who made a huge impact on our world was Amelia Earhart. Amelia Earhart was an adventurous, confident person who broke several world records for flying and was the first person to fly across the Atlantic Ocean. She was -and still is- a great role model to all boys and girls.
Image result for amelia earhart
Image result for amelia earhart


Personal Background


Amelia Earhart was born in Atchison, Kansas on July 24, 1897 (Raymond). She spent a lot of time as as a child with her grandparents. Her and her sister, Muriel, were close and often looked for adventures and climbed trees together (Lewis). Her family moved around a lot because her father was a lawyer fora railroad company (Lewis). According to Lewis, Earhart's father lost his job due to a drinking problem. While she was in grade school, the teachers noticed she showed an "early aptitude" for math and science. Earhart attended Hyde High School and excelled at chemistry. Before she realized she wanted to be a pilot, she volunteered to be a external image arrow-10x10.png aide during World War I. After that, she enrolled in medical studies at Columbia University. However, she quit about a year later to be with her parents. Amelia Earhart knew she wanted fly when she attended the Long Beach Air Show. She had to work a variety of jobs to pay for flying lessons. In the summer of 1921, she purchased her first airplane. Her goal was to become a respected aviator- even if she was a girl. Once her inheritance ran out, though, she had to sell her precious plane. Earhart became a teacher, then a social worker. She also wrote articles in the local newspaper promoting women to become pilots. Amelia set- and broke- many worldwide flying records. She was the first person to fly by herself from Hawaii to the mainland (Lewis). She even flew First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt over Washington D.C. On February 7, 1931, Amelia Earhart married George P. Putnam. Earhart wanted to fly around the world and set off with her co-pilot on June 1, 1987. Everyone searched for them, but was not successful. to this day, we have only found fragments of her plane and maybe some of her bones. Scientists, however, are not sure whether or not those are her bones or if they are even human (Sherman). Too much time may have passed for them to know for sure.
Image result for amelia earhart
Image result for amelia earhart










Personality Traits

Amelia Earhart was an independent and hardworking woman (Jacobson). She didn't give up when things got hard and certainly not because she wasn't a "natural" when it came to being a pilot. She worked hard and had a passion for flying (Ryskamp). She often said, "the most effective way to do it is to do it" (Earhart). She didn't believe in sexism. According to Earhart, "women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure should be but a challenge to others" (Earhart). Earhart was also very compassionate. She feels that, "the more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one's appreciation of fundamental things like external image arrow-10x10.png, and love, and understanding companionship" (Earhart). Amelia Earhart was a great women and a great role model to children and adults alike.
Image result for amelia earhart
Image result for amelia earhart



Obstacles


Amelia Earhart has faced many obstacles i her life. While growing up, she was constantly being judged because she preferred "boy" external image arrow-10x10.png to girl ones (Golgowski). They viewed her as weird and different. Another major obstacle is the fact that her father was an alcoholic. Because of this, Amelia Earhart's parents got external image arrow-10x10.png. On September 23, 1930, her father died of stomach cancer (Sherman). Earhart had to move around and was poor. In order to pay for her flying lessons, she had to do a variety of odd external image arrow-10x10.png (Sherman). And, when she ran out of money, she had to sell her plane. Earhart's biggest obstacle, however, was disappearing on her journey around the world (Jacobson).


Image result for amelia earhart
Image result for amelia earhart









Historical Significance



Amelia Earhart had a major impact on the world. She taught us that anything was possible. Earhart was an idol for boys and girls and adults alike who wanted to be a pilot- she was even an idol for people who didn't want to be pilots. She external image arrow-10x10.png many aviation records, including becoming the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean in 198 (Jacobson). She set a women's altitude record on April 8, 1931 (Raymond). On June 25, 1930, she set the women's sped record. In 1937, Earhart attempted to become the first person to fly around the world at its longest point, ever (Golgowski). It was then that she external image arrow-10x10.png. However, she didn't just have a significance on the world just because she was a pilot. She taught the world many lessons through her determination, passion, and hard work. She faced many obstacles, but she still got back on her get and tried again. In fact, she often said, "I want to do it because I want to do it" (Earhart). She didn't conform into what I'm sure society wanted her to be. She became an independent woman who did what she truly loved. Amelia Earhart was a passionate lady about flying and lived her dreams. She changed how people viewed the world and had people questioning whether or not they were doing what they truly loved. Multiple people spent years loping for her and her co-pilot after they external image arrow-10x10.png. To this day, scientists still look for them on deserted island. Earhart was a wonderful human being who influenced our world without even trying.
Image result for amelia earhart
Image result for amelia earhart




Works Cited



Golgowski, Nina. "external image arrow-10x10.png discovery in external image arrow-10x10.png for Amelia Earhart"s Plane." Daily external image arrow-10x10.png. 31 May 2013. Web. 10 Dec. 2014.

Jacobson, Randall S., "The World Attempt, Second Attempt: The Final Fight." Tighar. Web. 4 Nov 2014.

Raymond, Allen. "Amelia Earhart Flies Atlantic, First Woman To Do It." Nytimes. Elibrary. Web. 19 Nov. 2014.

Ryskamp, Dani Alexis. "Amelia Earhart". About. Web. 15 Sep. 2014

Sherman, Stephen. "Amelia Earhart: Aviatrix Lost Over the Pacific Ocean." Acepilots. 26 Sep. 2012. Web. 16 Oct. 2014

Szalay, Jessie. "Amelia Earhart: Biography and Facts About Disappearance." Livescience. 06 May 2014: Web. 2 Oct. 2014